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Research Papers

Modified Elliptical Machine Motor-Drive Design for Assistive Gait Rehabilitation

[+] Author and Article Information
Carl A. Nelson

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, N104 SEC, Lincoln, NE 68588-0656cnelson5@unl.edu

Judith M. Burnfield

Movement and Neurosciences Center, Institute for Rehabilitation Science and Engineering, Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital, 5401 South Street, Lincoln, NE 68506jburnfield@madonna.org

Yu Shu

Movement and Neurosciences Center, Institute for Rehabilitation Science and Engineering, Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital, 5401 South Street, Lincoln, NE 68506yshu@madonna.org

Thad W. Buster

Movement and Neurosciences Center, Institute for Rehabilitation Science and Engineering, Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital, 5401 South Street, Lincoln, NE 68506tbuster@madonna.org

Adam P. Taylor

Movement and Neurosciences Center, Institute for Rehabilitation Science and Engineering, Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital, 5401 South Street, Lincoln, NE 68506ataylor@madonna.org

Andrew Graham

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, N104 SEC, Lincoln, NE 68588-0656agraham1259@hotmail.com

J. Med. Devices 5(2), 021001 (May 02, 2011) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003693 History: Received October 06, 2010; Revised February 18, 2011; Published May 02, 2011; Online May 02, 2011

Current gait rehabilitation systems have limited use in community and home settings due to issues of design, cost, and demands on clinical staff. To overcome these challenges, a new gait rehabilitation machine was designed and developed by modifying an existing elliptical trainer. The Intelligently Controlled Assistive Rehabilitation Elliptical (ICARE) provides answers to design limitations that occur in partial-bodyweight-support treadmill systems and other robotic systems by providing a simulated gait motion without the financial and human resource challenges. The ICARE system integrates ergonomic, comfort and safety enhancements with a motor-drive system to optimize usability by individuals with physical disabilities in hospitals, homes, and fitness settings. The affordable new design provides a complete system that reduces physical demands on clinical staff without compromising patient safety. Development and preliminary testing of the ICARE’s motor-drive system are detailed.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Treadmill rehabilitation with PBWS (Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital's Institute for Rehabilitation Science and Engineering)

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Figure 2

Kinematic and electromyographic evaluation of existing elliptical machine (Madonna Rehabilitation Hospital’s Institute for Rehabilitation Science and Engineering)

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Figure 3

View of installed pulleys to motor with flat belt

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Figure 4

View of the right foot pedal attached to the roller on the curved portion of the main coupler

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Figure 5

Layout of pulley dimensions (in inches; 0.5 in.=1.3 cm, 1 in.=2.5 cm, 1.25 in.=3.2 cm, 4.05 in.=10.3 cm, 6 in.=15.2 cm, 6.75 in.=17.1 cm, 10.5 in.=26.7 cm, 14 in.=35.6 cm, 58 in.=147.3 cm)

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Figure 6

Kinematic schematic of elliptical machine. Approximate dimensions in inches (cm): rocker (full) 36 (91), rocker (to upper coupler) adjustable, fixed-center distance 63 (160), crank 10.5 (27), foot pedal link 18 (46), and coupler 58 (147). Note the flat foot pedal and the curved cam below it.

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Figure 7

Circle highlights control-box remote used for speed manipulation

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Figure 8

Circle highlights the initial safety switch design

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Figure 9

Circle highlights the final safety switch design

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Figure 10

Motor current output as a function of time when a participant without known disability trains at 25 rpm. Numbered phases in the movement cycle: (1) left midstance (pedal most inferior) and right midswing (pedal most superior), (2) right initial contact/loading response (pedal most anterior) and left preswing (pedal most posterior), (3) right midstance (pedal most inferior) and left midswing (pedal most superior), and (4) left initial contact/loading response (pedal most anterior) and right preswing (pedal most posterior).

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Figure 11

Single-sided amplitude spectrum of motor current output when a participant without known disability trains at 25 rpm

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Figure 12

Motor current output as a function of time when a participant with bilateral weakness and greater right-side involvement due to Parkinson's disease trains at 25 rpm. Numbered gait markers are same as in Fig. 1.

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Figure 13

Single-sided amplitude spectrum of motor current output when a participant with bilateral weakness and greater right-side involvement due to Parkinson's disease trains at 25 rpm. Spectrum for a healthy participant shown for comparison.

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Figure 14

Motor current output as a function of time when a participant with left-side weakness due to traumatic brain injury trains at 25 rpm. Numbered gait markers are same as in Fig. 1.

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Figure 15

Single-sided amplitude spectrum of motor current output when a participant with left-side weakness due to traumatic brain injury trains at 25 rpm. Spectrum for a healthy participant shown for comparison.

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Figure 16

Motor current output as a function of time when a healthy participant of Fig. 1 trains at 60 rpm. Numbered gait markers are same as in Fig. 1.

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Figure 17

Single-sided amplitude spectrum of motor current output for healthy participant of Fig. 1 at 60 rpm, showing smaller peak at higher frequency. Spectrum for 25 rpm operation shown for comparison.

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