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Research Papers

Micropatterned Treads for In Vivo Robotic Mobility

[+] Author and Article Information
Levin J. Sliker

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, 427 UCB, 1111 Engineering Drive, Boulder, CO 80309-0427levin.sliker@colorado.edu

Xin Wang

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, 427 UCB, 1111 Engineering Drive, Boulder, CO 80309-0427xin.wang@colorado.edu

Jonathan A. Schoen

Department of Surgery, University of Colorado at Denver, 12631 E 14th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80045jonathan.schoen@ucdenver.edu

Mark E. Rentschler

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, 427 UCB, 1111 Engineering Drive, Boulder, CO 80309-0427mark.rentschler@colorado.edu

J. Med. Devices 4(4), 041006 (Dec 03, 2010) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002761 History: Received September 10, 2010; Revised October 06, 2010; Published December 03, 2010; Online December 03, 2010

Despite revolutionary advances in many fields of medicine, there are no active mobile in vivo devices commercially available, or in use, today. Several research groups are actively looking at a number of mobility methods in a number of lumens but little commercial work has been done. While robotic surgery is available today, thanks to ex vivo robots, such as the da Vinci surgical system, these methods are very expensive, require heavy external equipment, and are still constrained by entry incisions. An alternative approach may be to place the robot completely inside the patient. Such devices may enable noninvasive imaging and diagnostics. These devices may be significantly less expensive than current minimally invasive methods, without extensive support equipment, which may allow them to be also used routinely in the emergency room (ER)/trauma sites and remote locations. This work explores micropatterned treads that may enable mobile capsule crawlers inside the body. Current research efforts into providing contact locomotion using micro-tread tracks are explored including initial drawbar force generation experimental results, dynamic finite element analysis with these tread designs, and in vivo porcine evaluation and comparison of two leading tread designs.

Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Optical microscope view of micro-tread pattern with 1:2 aspect ratio (height:width)

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Figure 2

Profile view of micro-tread pattern with 100× magnification

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Figure 3

Benchtop testing platform schematic

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Figure 4

Close-up view of the laboratory benchtop testing platform

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Figure 5

Typical trial results of patterned PDMS on synthetic tissue

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Figure 6

Test results for varying normal forces (equally spaced circular pillars)

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Figure 7

Drawbar force results for patterns of circular pillars at 0.10 N normal force

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Figure 8

Drawbar force results for patterns of circular pillars at 0.20 N normal force

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Figure 9

Drawbar force results for patterns of circular pillars at 0.30 N normal force

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Figure 10

Drawbar force results for patterns of circular pillars at 0.53 N normal force

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Figure 11

Drawbar results for alternative shaped tread patterns at 0.10 N normal force

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Figure 12

Drawbar results for alternative shaped tread patterns at 0.20 N normal force

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Figure 13

Drawbar results for alternative shaped tread patterns at 0.30 N normal force

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Figure 14

Drawbar results for alternative shaped tread patterns at 0.53 N normal force

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Figure 15

2D-planar model of PDMS micro-treads on tissue (using properties of viscoelastic liver)

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Figure 16

Results of the numerical simulation using ABAQUS . The patterned tread (bottom) performs superior to the smooth tread (top).

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Figure 17

Results of the pillar density simulation. The low density pillars (top) had a larger horizontal displacement during the simulation than the high density pillars (bottom).

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Figure 18

Robot used for in vivo comparison of micropatterned versus smooth wheels

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Figure 19

In vivo robot on small bowel (view from laparoscope)

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Figure 20

In vivo robot on liver (view from laparoscope)

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