0
Research Papers

Development of a Colonoscope Sheath Device for Colonoscopy

[+] Author and Article Information
JungHun Choi

254 Stocker Center, Department of Mechanical Engineering,  Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 e-mail: choij1@ohio.edu

David Drozek

Department of Specialty Medicine,  College of Osteopathic Medicine, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 e-mail: drozek@oucom.ohiou.edu

J. Med. Devices 5(3), 031005 (Aug 08, 2011) (9 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004418 History: Received December 06, 2010; Revised May 27, 2011; Published August 08, 2011; Online August 08, 2011

Endoscopy is a minimally invasive procedure using instruments that pass through the body for diagnostic purposes and minimizes the risks associated with open surgery. Colonoscopy can viewed as an endoscopic procedure of the colon. Colonoscopy may cause extreme discomfort to the patient and also carries the risks of perforating the lining of the colon, splenic ruptures, or bleeding. The technology is an endoscope that has an exoskeleton structure of controllable stiffness and a highly flexible stem. The device saves the patient from the pain caused by the shaft of a colonoscope when it is guided from the anus to the end of the sigmoid colon. The stiffenable sheath guides the shaft of the colonoscope up to the end of the sigmoid colon to avoid looping the shaft of the colonoscope. A prototype of the device was built and tested to validate its effectiveness. In order to further improve the performance of the device, skilled endoscopists tested and validated the device using a colonoscopy training model. The colonoscopy training model is comprised of a configurable rubber colon, a human torso, a display, and sensing part. It measures the forces caused by the distal tip and the shaft of the colonoscope and the pressure to open up the lumen. The force sensors at the rubber colon constraints measure the forces, and the real-time display panel will show the results to the colonoscopist and record the data for analysis. The endoscopy sheath device improves the process of endoscopy by reducing the mechanical trauma and loops caused by the shaft of the endoscope. With the guide provided by the colonoscope sheath, the forces to the constraints of a colon are significantly decreased in the sigmoid colon. The colonoscope sheath helps to reduce the force to constraints of the colon and isolates the direct contact between the shaft of a colonoscope and a colon wall up to the end of the sigmoid colon. For the complicated shape of the colon, the endoscopy sheath also solved possible looping problems. The colonoscope training model effectively measures the forces and makes it possible to validate the effectiveness of the endoscopy sheath.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Topics: Force , Endoscopes , Stiffness
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

The stiffenable colonoscope sheath

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Colonoscopy training model (the numbers are the locations of load cells)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Moment versus radius of curvature of the shaft: (a) section 1, (b) section 2, and (c) section 3

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Maximum moments with respect to various directions of the colonoscope sheath

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Force versus time from ten load cells in the colonoscope training model. The left figure is the force measurement without the colonoscope sheath, and the right figure is with the colonoscope sheath [33].

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Force measurement of each sensor with respect to the operation time. The left figure is the force measurement without the colonoscope sheath and the right figure is with the colonoscope sheath [33].

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In