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Research Papers

Bioinspired Crown-Cutter—The Impact of Tooth Quantity and Bevel Type on Tissue Deformation, Penetration Forces, and Tooth Collapsibility

[+] Author and Article Information
Filip Jelínek

BioMechanical Engineering Department,
Faculty Mechanical, Maritime and
Materials Engineering,
Delft University of Technology,
Mekelweg 2, Delft 2628 CD, Netherlands
e-mail: F.Jelinek@tudelft.nl

Jeffrey Goderie

BioMechanical Engineering Department,
Faculty Mechanical, Maritime and
Materials Engineering,
Delft University of Technology,
Mekelweg 2, Delft 2628 CD, Netherlands
e-mail: C.J.M.Goderie@student.tudelft.nl

Alice van Rixel

BioMechanical Engineering Department,
Faculty Mechanical, Maritime and
Materials Engineering,
Delft University of Technology,
Mekelweg 2, Delft 2628 CD, Netherlands
e-mail: A.M.E.vanRixel@student.tudelft.nl

Daan Stam

BioMechanical Engineering Department,
Faculty Mechanical, Maritime and
Materials Engineering,
Delft University of Technology,
Mekelweg 2, Delft 2628 CD, Netherlands
e-mail: I.D.Stam@student.tudelft.nl

Johan Zenhorst

BioMechanical Engineering Department,
Faculty Mechanical, Maritime and
Materials Engineering,
Delft University of Technology,
Mekelweg 2, Delft 2628 CD, Netherlands
e-mail: J.Zenhorst@student.tudelft.nl

Paul Breedveld

BioMechanical Engineering Department,
Faculty Mechanical, Maritime and
Materials Engineering,
Delft University of Technology,
Mekelweg 2, Delft 2628 CD, Netherlands
e-mail: P.Breedveld@tudelft.nl

Manuscript received November 28, 2013; final manuscript received March 3, 2014; published online xx xx, xxxx. Assoc. Editor: Rafael V. Davalos.

J. Med. Devices 8(4), 041009 (Aug 19, 2014) (6 pages) Paper No: MED-13-1286; doi: 10.1115/1.4027054 History: Received November 28, 2013; Revised March 03, 2014

Current keyhole biopsy devices are rather ungainly, inaccurate, and limited in application. A keyhole biopsy harvester was designed to facilitate peripheral cancerous tissue detection and resection at high speed and accuracy. The harvester's cutting tool, the crown-cutter, was bioinspired by the sea urchin's chewing organ—Aristotle's lantern. This paper focuses on the optimization of the crown-cutter with regard to the impact of different tooth quantity and bevel type on tissue deformation, penetration forces, and tooth collapsibility. Two sets of crown-cutter designs were manufactured and tested in push-in experiments using gelatin—the first set having no bevel and differing tooth quantity (4, 6, 8, 10 teeth) and the second set of constant tooth quantity and differing bevel type (no, inner, outer, and inner and outer bevel). The gelatin surface deformation and the penetration forces were evaluated utilizing a high speed camera and a universal testing machine, respectively. The experimental results on the crown-cutters of different tooth quantity (no bevel) showed a steady increase in the tissue deformation with the increasing amount of teeth. Unlike the bevel type, the different tooth quantity revealed significant differences with regard to the tissue deformation in between 4 versus 6-teeth and 10 versus 6-teeth cutters. As for the penetration forces, the significant difference was found only between 10 and 6-teeth cutters. In conclusion, reducing the cutter's tooth quantity resulted in lower tissue deformation, whereas differing the bevel type was found to have a negligible influence. Ultimately, a high ratio of outward to inward tooth collapsibility and a relatively low inner moment of inertia proved the 6-teeth cutter to be the most optimal.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Contemporary biopsy techniques including (a) fine-needle aspiration, (b) core needle biopsy, and (c) punch biopsy; adopted from Refs. [6] and [7]

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Fig. 2

Keyhole biopsy harvester [6] and its working principle combining optical and mechanical biopsy

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Fig. 3

Close-up of (a) sea urchin Echinus esculentus, adopted from Refs. [6] and [14], and its chewing organ Aristotle's lantern that served as a biological inspiration for (b) the biopsy harvester's crown-cutter [6]

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Fig. 4

Cutter designs of different tooth quantity (4, 6, 8, and 10 teeth with no bevel) and different bevel type (no, inner, outer, and inner and outer bevel on cutters with 6 teeth)

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Fig. 5

Experimental setup and the cutter's initial and final positions indicating the maximum gelatin deformation H

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Fig. 6

Generic tooth cross section of radius R, shell thickness t, and central angle θ. Moment of inertia of the tooth cross-section is evaluated about axes y (in) and y (out) for inward and outward bend, respectively.

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Fig. 7

(a) Maximum tissue deformation results of the Ø 9 mm unsharpened crown-cutters of different tooth quantity when penetrated 9.8 mm. (b) Plot of force on tissue against cutter travel of the Ø 9 mm unsharpened crown-cutters of different tooth quantity.

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Fig. 8

(a) Maximum tissue deformation results of the Ø 9 mm 6-teeth crown-cutters of different bevel type when penetrated 9.8 mm. (b) Plot of force on tissue against cutter travel of the Ø 9 mm 6-teeth crown-cutters of different bevel type.

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Fig. 9

Plot of inward and outward tooth collapsibility expressed as a moment of inertia of a maximum tooth cross-section with respect to axes y (in) and y (out) against increasing tooth quantity

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