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Research Papers

Toward Incorporating the Infant Weight Into Incubator's Automatic Temperature Control

[+] Author and Article Information
Bassam Al-Naami

Department of Biomedical Engineering,
Hashemite University,
P.O. Box 150459,
Zarqa 13115, Jordan
e-mail: b.naami@hu.edu.jo

Abdel-Razzak Al-Hinnawi

Department of Medical Imaging,
Hashemite University,
P.O. Box 330127,
Zarqa 13115, Jordan
e-mail: hinawiabed@hu.edu.jo

Ahmad Al-Kiswani, Ala'a Dahabreh, Faris Al-Assaf, Mohd Kullab

Department of Biomedical Engineering,
Hashemite University,
P.O. Box 150459,
Zarqa 13115, Jordan

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received June 20, 2015; final manuscript received January 26, 2016; published online February 11, 2016. Editor: Rupak K. Banerjee.

J. Med. Devices 10(1), 011007 (Feb 11, 2016) (6 pages) Paper No: MED-15-1205; doi: 10.1115/1.4032633 History: Received June 20, 2015; Revised January 26, 2016

A premature infant needs a stable thermal environment. This paper studies if the infant weight can be employed in the standard heat regulation system in incubators. This was done in two stages. First, a weight sensor was designed by means of using strain gauge in order to provide weight measurement. Later, a heat regulation circuit was designed and implemented by means of using a microcontroller. The humidity, environmental and skin temperature, and infant's weight are measured and used as inputs. The experiments showed that infant's weight can be successfully added to the control circuit in the incubator instrument. The results showed that infant's weight can productively contribute in temperature control with good confidence. The average standard error was equal to 0.48 °C. The results reveal that the infant's weight can contribute to increase quality assurance of incubators.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

The block diagram of the proposed heat regulation system

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Fig. 2

The top and front view of the load cell transducer

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Fig. 3

The designed heating system

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Fig. 4

Observing the target temperature Ta at successive time intervals

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Fig. 5

Observing the target temperature Ta at successive time intervals

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Fig. 6

Observing the target temperature Ta at successive time intervals

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Fig. 7

Observing the target temperature Ta at successive time intervals

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Fig. 8

Observing the target temperature Ta = 31.5 °C at successive time intervals

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