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Research Papers

Influence of a Commercial Antithrombotic Filter on the Caval Blood Flow During Neutra and Valsalva Maneuver

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Nicolás, B. Lucea

Aragón Institute of Engineering Research (I3A),
Universidad de Zaragoza,
C/María de Luna s/n,
Zaragoza E-50018, Spain

A. Laborda, M. A. De Gregorio

Grupo de Investigación Técnicas de Mínima
Invasión (GITMI),
Faculty of Veterinary,
Universidad de Zaragoza,
C/Miguel Servet 177,
Zaragoza E-50013, Spain

E. Peña, M. A. Martínez

Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red en
Bioingeniería Biomateriales y Nanomedicina
(CIBER-BBN),
Aragón Institute of Engineering Research (I3A),
Universidad de Zaragoza,
C/María de Luna s/n,
Zaragoza E-50018, Spain

M. Malvè

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Energetics and Materials,
Public University of Navarra,
Campus Arrosadía,
Pamplona E-36001, Spain;
Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red en
Bioingeniería Biomateriales y Nanomedicina
(CIBER-BBN),
Aragón Institute of Engineering Research (I3A),
Universidad de Zaragoza,
C/María de Luna s/n,
Zaragoza E-50018, Spain
e-mail: mauro.malve@unavarra.es

Manuscript received February 16, 2016; final manuscript received December 19, 2016; published online June 27, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Xiaoming He.

J. Med. Devices 11(3), 031002 (Jun 27, 2017) (11 pages) Paper No: MED-16-1033; doi: 10.1115/1.4035983 History: Received February 16, 2016; Revised December 19, 2016

Anticoagulants are the treatment of choice for pulmonary embolism. When these fail or are contraindicated, vena cava filters are effective devices for preventing clots from the legs from migrating to the lung. Many uncertainties exist when a filter is inserted, especially during physiological activity such as normal breathing and the Valsalva maneuver. These activities are often connected with filter migration and vena cava damage due to the various related vein geometrical configurations. In this work, we analyzed the response of the vena cava during normal breathing and Valsalva maneuver, for a healthy vena cava and after insertion of a commercial Günther-Tulip® filter. Validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and patient specific data are used for analyzing blood flow inside the vena cava during these maneuvers. While during normal breathing, the vena cava flow can be considered almost stationary with a very low pressure gradient, during Valsalva the extravascular pressure compresses the vena cava resulting in a drastic reduction of the vein section, a global flow decrease through the cava but increasing the velocity magnitude. This change in the section is altered by the presence of the filter which forces the section of the vena cava before the renal veins to keep open. The effect of the presence of the filter is investigated during these maneuvers showing changes in wall shear stress and velocity patterns.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

cad model of vena cava during normal breathing (a), normal breathing with filter (b), Valsalva without filter (c), and Valsalva with filter (d). (e) The Günther-Tulip® filter cad model.

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Fig. 2

Vena cava sections in the absence and in the presence of the Günther-Tulip® filter during normal breathing (left subfigures) and Valsalva (right subfigures)

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Fig. 3

Details of the vena cava grid after device deployment (as an example during normal breathing): close up view of the filter struts and the filter middle section

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Fig. 4

Geometry for patients A and B showing the locations where the IVC areas have been studied (a). Boundary conditions for neutra and Valsalva maneuvers (b): mixed measured pressure/velocity conditions are used.

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Fig. 5

Comparison between the vena cava fluid dynamics without filter (a) and after device deployment (b) in neutral conditions. On the upper panel, velocity magnitude is displayed on transversal cut planes, on the lower panel three-dimensional streamlines are shown.

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Fig. 6

Comparison between the vena cava fluid dynamics without filter (a) and after device deployment (b) during Valsalva. On the upper panel, velocity magnitude is displayed on transversal cut planes, and on the lower panel three-dimensional streamlines are shown.

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Fig. 7

Comparison between the vena cava WSS distribution without filter (left panel (a)) and after device deployment (right panel (b)) during normal breathing. The lines along which the WSS is displayed are obtained as intersection between the geometry and a longitudinal cutting-plane as sketched in the figure.

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Fig. 8

Comparison between the vena cava WSS distribution without filter (left panel (a)) and after device deployment (right panel (b)) during Valsalva. The lines along which the WSS is displayed are obtained as intersection between the geometry and a longitudinal cutting-plane as sketched in the figure.

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