0
Research Papers

Design of a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Guided Magnetically Actuated Steerable Catheter

[+] Author and Article Information
Taoming Liu

Department of Electrical Engineering
and Computer Science,
Case Western Reserve University,
Cleveland, OH 44106
e-mail: txl168@case.edu

Nate Lombard Poirot

Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
Case Western Reserve University,
Cleveland, OH 44106
e-mail: njl49@case.edu

Tipakorn Greigarn

Department of Electrical Engineering
and Computer Science,
Case Western Reserve University,
Cleveland, OH 44106
e-mail: txg92@case.edu

M. Cenk Çavuşoğlu

Department of Electrical Engineering
and Computer Science,
Case Western Reserve University,
Cleveland, OH 44106
e-mail: mcc14@case.edu

Manuscript received June 24, 2016; final manuscript received February 25, 2017; published online May 3, 2017. Assoc. Editor: Marc Horner.

J. Med. Devices 11(2), 021004 (May 03, 2017) (11 pages) Paper No: MED-16-1248; doi: 10.1115/1.4036095 History: Received June 24, 2016; Revised February 25, 2017

This paper presents design optimization of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) actuated steerable catheter for atrial fibrillation ablation in the left atrium. The catheter prototype, built over polymer tubing, is embedded with current-carrying electromagnetic coils. The prototype can be deflected to a desired location by controlling the currents passing through the coils. The design objective is to develop a prototype that can successfully accomplish the ablation task. To complete the tasks, the catheter needs to be capable of reaching a set of desired targets selected by a physician on the chamber and keeping a stable contact with the chamber surface. The design process is based on the maximization of the steering performance of the catheter by evaluating its workspace in free space. The selected design is validated by performing a simulation of an ablation intervention on a virtual model of the left atrium with a real atrium geometry. This validation shows that the prototype can reach every target required by the ablation intervention and provide an appropriate contact force against the chamber.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

(a) An illustration of left atrial fibrillation ablation in the left atrium. (Copyright IEEE 2014. Reprinted with permission [7].) (b) A general structure of an MRI-actuated steerable catheter. The catheter is embedded with two coil sets (proximal coil set and distal coil set). Each coil set includes one axial coil and two orthogonal side coil.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Diagram of a catheter equipped with one set of embedded current-carrying coils, which is divided into N finite segments. (Copyright IEEE 2014. Reprinted with permission [7].)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Illustration of a catheter in point-contact with a chamber surface on a tangent plane

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

The definitions of the base and tip coordinate frames. (a) The dashed curve represents the initial shape of the catheter under its gravity without actuation. The solid curve represents the shape of the catheter under actuation and gravity. (b) The definitions of the deflection angles θ and ϕ. Ztc is the Z unit vector of frame Tc represented in frame Ti.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Workspace of a catheter with a single set of actuator coils made of a material with density 800 kg/m3, Young's modulus 5 MPa, and Poisson's ratio 0.25. (a) The workspace in Cartesian space. (b) The distribution of the deflection angles in a polar plot.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

Results of the factorial design experiments. The units for horizontal axes of density and Young's modulus are kg/m3 and MPa, respectively. Poisson's ratio and workspace have no unit. (a) Main effects plot in the first experiment and (b) main effects plot in the second experiment.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 7

Simulation setup. (a) How a patient would be positioned inside an MRI scanner. (b) The resulting geometry of the atrial fibrillation ablation task in the left atrium model [30]. The black markers are the desired targets for atrial fibrillation ablation. The black polygons around the pulmonary veins represent the circumferential lesions.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Workspace of the optimized catheter design. (a) The workspace in Cartesian space. The curve shows a deflection motion of catheter. (b) The distribution of the deflection angles in a polar plot.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Computed configurations of the catheter for left atrial fibrillation ablation. Curves represent the deflected catheters. The values marked on the axes denote the coordinates with respect to the patient coordinate frame defined in Fig. 7(a). (a) Ablation on right superior pulmonary vein (RSPV), (b) ablation on right inferior pulmonary vein (RIPV), (c) ablation on left superior pulmonary vein (LSPV), and (d) ablation on left inferior pulmonary vein (LIPV).

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Magnitude of normal contact force on each ablation target in this simulation

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Workspace of a catheter prototype with an insertion length, 60 mm, with respect to the global frame

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In