0
research-article

A new surgical drill instrument with force sensing and force feedback for robotically assisted otologic surgery

[+] Author and Article Information
Hongqiang Sang

Advanced Mechatronics Equipment Technology Tianjin Area Major Laboratory, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387, China
sanghongqiang@tjpu.edu.cn

Reza Monfaredi

The Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Children's National Health System, Washington, D.C, 20010, USA
rmonfare@childrensnational.org

Emmanuel Wilson

The Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Children's National Health System, Washington, D.C, 20010, USA
emmanuel.wilson@gmail.com

Hadi Fooladi

The Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Children's National Health System, Washington, D.C, 20010, USA
HFOOLADIT@childrensnational.org

Diego Preciado

The Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Children's National Health System, Washington, D.C, 20010, USA
dpreciad@childrensnational.org

Kevin Cleary

The Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Children's National Health System, Washington, D.C, 20010, USA
KCleary@childrensnational.org

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4036490 History: Received September 26, 2016; Revised March 28, 2017

Abstract

Background: Drilling through bone is a common task during otologic procedures. Currently, the drilling tool is manually held by the surgeon. This project was to demonstrate the feasibility of using the da Vinci Research Kit (dVRK) to hold the drill and provide force feedback for temporal bone drilling. Methods: A modified da Vinci surgical instrument with force sensing was developed to enable robotically assisted drilling for otologic surgery. To provide intuitive motion and force feedback, the master–slave kinematics were analyzed and a suitable mapping was implemented. Results: Several experiments were completed including trajectory tracking of master–slave motion, drill instrument calibration, and force feedback using a temporal bone model. The results showed that good trajectory tracking performance, and minor calibration errors were achieved. In addition, force feedback from the drill instrument could be felt at the master arm. Conclusions: A robotically assisted surgical drill for otologic surgery was developed and demonstrated using the dVRK. In the future, it may be feasible to use master–slave surgical robot systems for temporal bone drilling.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In