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research-article

FORCE AND MOTION SENSING FOR INSTRUMENT-ASSISTED SOFT TISSUE MANIPULATION DEVICE

[+] Author and Article Information
Ahmed Mohammed AlOtaibi

School of Mechanical Engineering Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA
alotaib3@purdue.edu

Sohel Anwar

Department of Mechanical Engineering IUPUI, Indianapolis, IN, USA
soanwar@iupui.edu

M. Terry Loghmani

School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences IUPUI, Indianapolis, IN, USA
mloghman@iu.edu

Stanley Chien

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering IUPUI, Indianapolis, IN, USA
schien@iupui.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4036654 History: Received November 06, 2016; Revised April 28, 2017

Abstract

Instrument-assisted soft tissue manipulation (IASTM) is a form of mechanotherapy, e.g. massage, that uses rigid devices which may be machined or casted. The delivered force, which is a critical parameter during IASTM, has not been measured or standardized for use during clinical practice. In addition to the force, the angle of treatment and stroke frequency play an important role during IASTM. As a result, there is a strong need to characterize the IASTM delivered force, angle of treatment, and stroke frequency. This paper presents a novel, mechatronic design of an IASTM device used to clinically deliver localized pressure to the soft tissue. The proposed design uses a 3D load cell, which can measure all three force components force simultaneously. The device design was implemented using IMUduino microcontroller chip which can provide tool orientation angles. These orientation angles were used for coordinate transformation of the measured forces to the skin interface. Additionally, the measured force data was used to compute the stroke frequency. This mechatronic IASTM tool was validated for force measurements using an electronic plate scale that provided the baseline force values to compare with the applied force values measured by the tool. The load cell measurements and the scale readings were found to be in agreement within the expected degree of accuracy.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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