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Review Article

Ventricular assist devices: current state and challenges

[+] Author and Article Information
Siamak Nezami Doost Alamdari

Biomechanical and Tissue Engineering Lab, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Australia, 1 Alfred Street- Hawthorn - VIC 3122 - Australia, H38 - EN403/23
sndoost@swin.edu.au

Liang Zhong

National Heart Research Institute of Singapore, National Heart Centre, Singapore, National Heart Centre Singapore, 5 Hospital Drive 169609, Duke-NUS Medical School Singapore, 8 College Road, 169857
zhong.liang@nhcs.com.sg

Yosry Morsi

Biomechanical and Tissue Engineering Lab, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Australia, 1 Alfred Street- Hawthorn - VIC 3122 - Australia, H38 - ATC837
ymorsi@swin.edu.au

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4037258 History: Received December 12, 2016; Revised May 27, 2017

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease (CVD), as the most prevalent human disease, incorporates a broad spectrum of cardiovascular system malfunctions/disorders. While cardiac transplantation is widely acknowledged as the optional treatment for patients suffering from end-stage heart failure (HF), due to its related drawbacks, such as the unavailability of heart donors, alternative treatments, i.e., implanting a ventricular assist device (VAD), have been extensively utilized in recent years to recover heart function. However, this solution is thought problematic as it fails to satisfactorily provide lifelong support for patients at the end-stage of HF, nor does is solve the problem of their extensive post-surgery complications. In recent years, the huge technological advancements have enabled the manufacturing of a wide variety of reliable VAD devices which provides a promising avenue for utilizing VAD implantation as the destination therapy in the future. Along with typical VAD systems, other innovative mechanical devices for cardiac support, as well as cell therapy and bioartificial cardiac tissue, have resulted in researchers proposing a new HF therapy. This paper aims to concisely review the current state of VAD technology, summarize recent advancements, discuss related complications, and argue for the development of the envisioned alternatives of HF therapy. Keywords: Cardiovascular disease (CVD), ventricular assist device (VAD), Heart Failure

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
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