Numerical and Experimental Simulations of the Wireless Energy Transmission and Estimation of Energies Harvesting by an Electrofunctional Pill

[+] Author and Article Information
Elizabeth Shumbayawonda

Centre of Biomedical Engineering, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK

Ali Salifu

Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK

Constantina Lekakou

Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK

John Cosmas

Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Brunel University, Uxbridge UB8 3PH, UK

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4039390 History: Received May 03, 2017; Revised February 11, 2018


This paper investigates the energy transmitted to and harvested by a camera pill travelling along the gastrointestinal tract. It focuses on the transmitted electromagnetic (EM) energy in the frequency range of 0.18 to 2450 MHz and compares it to the mechanical energy due to the motion of the pill and the force exerted from the intestine in its peristalsis onto the pill, and the electrochemical energy due to the change of pH along the path of the pill. A comprehensive multilayer EM power transmission model is constructed and implemented in a numerical code, including power attenuation through each layer and multi-reflections at material interfaces. Computer simulations of EM power transmission through a multilayer abdomen to a pill travelling in the intestine are presented for the human abdominal cavity as well as phantom organs and phantom environments, coupled with corresponding experimental studies using these phantom components and environments. Two types of phantom abdomen are investigated: a ballistic gel and a multilayer duck breast. Phantom small intestine involves gelatin gel layers with embedded phantom chyme. Due to limitations related to the energy safety limit of skin exposure and energy losses in the transmission through the abdomen and intestines, inductive range frequencies are recommended which may yield energy harvesting of 10-50 mWh during 8 hours of pill journey, complemented by about 10 mWh of mechanical energy and 10 mWh of electrochemical energy harvesting, in addition to about 330 mWh typically stored in the coin batteries of a camera pill.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.






Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In