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research-article

The role of impulse, tissue stretching and tip geometry for tissue penetration of polymer needles

[+] Author and Article Information
Patrícia Filipa Pinheiro Silva

Technical University of Denmark, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Produktionstorvet b. 426B DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby
tichasilva@live.com.pt

Alexandros Drakidis

Technical University of Denmark, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Produktionstorvet b. 426B DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby
alexdrakides@gmail.com

Silvana Gomes

Technical University of Denmark, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Produktionstorvet b. 426B DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby
silvanagomes311@gmail.com

Torben Lenau

Technical University of Denmark, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Produktionstorvet b. 426B DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby
lenau@mek.dtu.dk

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4040492 History: Received August 10, 2017; Revised May 27, 2018

Abstract

Polymer needles for medical injections offer a range of opportunities like compatibility with magnetic resonance scanning and simultaneous delivery of more than one drug. However, the lower stiffness property of polymers compared to steel is a challenge for penetration. This paper explores strategies for higher penetration success, which include impulse insertion, tissue stretching and different tip geometries. The strategies are experimentally examined using artificial skin models. It is demonstrated that polymer needles have higher penetration rates when the strategies are applied. Penetration rates were only 10-20% when using slow speed insertion (0.2mm/s) but 100% penetration rates was achieved using impulse insertion. Penetration forces are similar for slow insertion speed and high speed (impulse insertion) and for needles made out of different material (polymer or steel). Animals like the mosquito and the woodpecker inspired the strategies. Conical and pyramidal tips were studied for polymer needles and a commercial bevel steel needle tip. The result was lower penetration forces and 100% penetration success was possible using the pyramidal polymer needles. For the model in study was observed a similar behaviour considering penetration force and rate of penetration success for steel and polymer pyramidal needles. An Anova statistical analysis show significance when using springs and strain, as well for the combination of both.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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