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research-article

Pulsatile Perfusion Bioreactor for Biomimetic Vascular Impedances

[+] Author and Article Information
David A. Prim

College of Engineering and Computing, Biomedical Engineering Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, 29208, Bldg.1, Rm. C-36, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, 29208
davidprim9@gmail.com

Jay Potts

School of Medicine, Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy and College of Engineering and Computing, Biomedical Engineering Program, Bldg.1, Rm. C-36, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, 29208
jay.potts@uscmed.sc.edu

John/F Eberth

School of Medicine, Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy and College of Engineering and Computing, Biomedical Engineering Program, Bldg.1, Rm. C-36, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, 29208
john.eberth@uscmed.sc.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4040648 History: Received January 07, 2018; Revised June 14, 2018

Abstract

Intricate patterns of blood pressure and flow are generated by the cyclic contraction and relaxation of the heart and the coordinated opening and closing of valves. These pulsatile waves are augmented by the resistance, compliance, and inertance properties of the vasculature, resulting in unique hemodynamic characteristics present at distinct anatomically locations. In vivo these hemodynamically generated loads, transduced as physical signals into resident vascular cells, are crucial to the maintenance and preservation of healthy vascular physiology. Failure to recreate biomimetic loading in vitro however, can lead to pathological gene expression and aberrant remodeling. As a generalized approach to improve native and engineered blood vessels, we have designed, built, and tested a pulsatile perfusion bioreactor based on the concept of biomimetic impedances. Here the elements of an incubator-based culture system were formulaically designed to match the vascular impedance of a brachial artery using a 5-element electrohydraulic analog that incorporates both inherent (systemic) and added elements. Using freshly harvested saphenous veins, the relative expression of seven known mechanically sensitive remodeling genes were analyzed using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Of these, we found plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (SERPINE1) and fibronectin 1 (FN1) to be highly sensitive to differences between arterial- and venous-like culture conditions after 6 hours in our bioreactor. The analytical approach and biological confirmation provide a framework towards the general design of hemodynamic-mimetic vascular culture systems.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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