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Research Papers

J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):011001-011001-9. doi:10.1115/1.4005778.

The primary objective of this project is to design, fabricate, and test a small, integrated camera system for aiding in the visualization and surgical repair of certain types of ventricular septal defects (VSD), in pediatric patients. Currently, no purpose-designed commercial device to view VSDs from the left ventricle of the heart exists. The left ventricular perspective is ideal for obtaining an unobstructed view of the VSD. This VSD camera device would also provide a platform for passing a suture through the hole in the ventricular septum, with future work implementing additional tools capable of more advanced tasks. This camera device will help solve some of the major issues currently associated with cardiac imaging and surgical closure of VSDs in newborns and young children This paper examines the design development and preliminary evaluation of a proof of concept device. Included are preliminary results of image quality comparisons, design details of a pediatric-specific VSD camera device, and initial outcomes from in vitro testing.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):011002-011002-5. doi:10.1115/1.4005779.

Jaw thrust is a common maneuver performed by medical care providers to open and maintain an airway in an unconscious patient. This essential procedure not only occupies a significant amount of time for the health care provider, but can also result in physical discomfort (low back pain) or fatigue when it is performed for an extended period of time. A mechanical device would not only prevent fatigue of the provider, but it can also free up time to perform other necessary tasks in management of the critically ill patient. The aim of this study is to develop a novel mechanical device that can perform jaw thrust on older children and adults along with maintaining an open airway. The jaw thrust device includes an extension arm mounted on a base to be placed on each side of the patient’s head. The mandible rest (jaw thruster) is mounted on each extension arm such that it can be positioned under the patient’s jaw. A chinstrap with rubber tubing is placed on four points across the base. A jaw thrusting pressure on the mandible rest causes a rotational force on the chin straps. This opens the mouth without substantially tilting the patient’s head. The device then maintains an open airway without any continuous attention. The supports on each side also immobilize the head in the midline and helps in maintaining the alignment of the cervical vertebrae. Finite element analyses of each of the components were done and a prototype was built for functional evaluation on a patient simulator. The device, when tested and applied to a human patient simulator in an ‘obstructed airway state,’ was able to open the airway evidenced by a cough reflex elicited in response. An ‘airway opened’ timestamp was also noted in the computer attached to the simulator.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):011003-011003-7. doi:10.1115/1.4005780.

A new percutaneous annuloplasty technique for mitral regurgitation is proposed here. In this technique, inter-related anchors are first inserted around the annulus via a trans-septal catheter. The tethered wire passed through the anchors is then pulled to shrink the annulus and stop regurgitation. The anchors should withstand large deformation, applied during the delivery process, and should recover their original shape after being released inside the tissue. The shape of the anchors is, thus, optimized in an iterative process, to avoid stress concentration by minimizing the weighted rms value of the curvature along the anchor. The weight coefficients in each iteration are defined based on the stress distribution of the anchor obtained in the previous iteration. The procedure finally results in a structurally optimum anchor with a minimum in the maximum von Mises stress. This anchor is fabricated from Nitinol and tested in a cadaveric swine heart.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):011004-011004-5. doi:10.1115/1.4005781.

Body powered hand prostheses require high physical user effort. This is caused by the stiffness of the cosmetic covering, or cosmetic glove. This paper aims to present a new concept of a mechanism for the compensation of the nonlinear stiffness of body powered hand prostheses by using static balancers with a nonlinear behavior. This concept is based on a cooperative action of snap-through behavior in multiple bi-stable spring mechanisms to create the nonlinear balancing force. To demonstrate the efficiency of the concept, an optimized design for a case study of a child-size hand prosthesis is also presented. A pattern search method was applied for the optimization. As a result, the calculated stiffness and thereby the operating effort was reduced by 96%. It can be concluded from the conceptual and numerical results that the presented concept provides a highly efficient solution to the discussed problem.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):011005-011005-12. doi:10.1115/1.4005784.

This paper describes a single degree-of-freedom active-knee transfemoral prosthesis to be used as a test bed for the development of architectures for myoelectric control. The development of an active-knee transfemoral prosthesis is motivated by the inability of passive commercial prostheses to provide the joint power required at the knee for many activities of daily living such as reciprocal stair ascent, which requires knee power outputs of up to 4 W/kg. Study of myoelectric control based on surface electromyogram (EMG) measurements of muscles in the residual limb is motivated by the desire to restore direct volitional control of the knee using a minimally-invasive neuromuscular control interface. The presented work describes the design of a transfemoral prosthesis prototype including the structure, actuation, instrumentation, electronics, and real-time control architecture. The performance characteristics of the prototype are discussed in the context of the requisite knee energetics for a variety of common locomotive functions. This paper additionally describes the development of a single-subject diagnostic socket with wall-embedded surface EMG electrodes and the implementation of a control architecture for myoelectric modulation of knee impedance. Experimental results of level walking for a single subject with unilateral transfemoral amputation demonstrate the potential for direct EMG-based control of locomotive function.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):011006-011006-6. doi:10.1115/1.4005787.

The anatomical ankle is capable of providing adaptation to sloped surfaces, a function that is not available in most traditional lower limb prostheses. Commercial prostheses that are claimed to adapt to slopes are limited by high cost, delay in response, reduced stability, and loss of energy through damping. The purpose of the present work was to develop a prototypical prosthetic ankle unit that adapts to sloped surfaces and is sufficiently durable for short-term take-home trials. The prototype switches between low and high rotational impedances by means of a wrap spring clutch mechanism. The clutch is held in a disengaged position when unloaded and deflection of a compressible pylon under axial load rotates a control collar and engages the clutch. The prototype was subjected to 100,000 cycles of mechanical endurance testing based on ISO 10328 standards to determine the suitability for two-week take-home testing. Three persons with unilateral transtibial amputations were recruited to test the prototype in the laboratory, providing subjective feedback through a survey and participating in a motion analysis study to confirm the performance of the slope adaptation function. Translation of the ankle moment-angle curves for all subjects along the ankle angle axis demonstrated a change of the ankle alignment when subjects walked with the adaptable ankle on surfaces of different slopes. The ankle moment-angle curves had a lower slope than the subjects’ usual prostheses, and some subjects had distinct flat regions in the moment-angle curves when using the adaptable ankle. The arbors of the clutch demonstrated significant wear when tested to 100,000 cycles based on ISO 10328 standards, yet the adaptable ankle continued to hold testing loads. The alignment change observed for sloped surfaces suggests the prototype was providing slope adaptation. The flat regions on the ankle moment-angle curves suggest the clutch may have been slipping. Refinement of the clutch engagement mechanism and continued development to reduce the weight and size of the prototype is needed prior to take-home testing.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):011007-011007-4. doi:10.1115/1.4005788.

Braided wire stents demonstrate distinct characteristics compared to welded ones. In this study, both braided and welded wire stents with the same nominal dimensions were crimped inside a sheath and then deployed into a stenosed artery using finite element analysis. The braided wire stent was generated by overlapping wires to form crisscross shape. A welded wire stent was created by welding the intersection points of wires to avoid sliding between wires. The effect of fabrication technique on mechanical behavior of Nitinol wire stents was evaluated. The results showed that relative sliding between wires reduced the deformation of the braided stent, which led to less radial strength than the welded one; therefore, the deployed braided stent was more conformed to the anatomic shape of the lesion and much less efficient for restoring the patency of the stenotic artery. Post balloon-dilation was commonly used to improve its performance in terms of lumen gain and deployed shape of the stent. On the contrary, the welded wire stent exhibited a high capacity for pushing the occlusion outward. It reached an approximately uniform shape after deployment. The welded joints caused larger deformation and high strain on the stent struts, which indicate a potential earlier failure for the welded stent. In addition, higher contact pressure at the stent-lesion interface and higher arterial stresses were observed in the artery supported by the welded stent. The peak stress concentration may increase the occurrence of neointimal hyperplasia.

Topics: Wire , stents , Manufacturing
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

Technical Briefs

J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):014501-014501-6. doi:10.1115/1.4005808.

The paper presents a new design of a stereo endoscope for minimally invasive surgery with: cameras positioned at the tip of the instrument (inside the patient), angle of convergence of the optical axes of the cameras variable continuously, and a foldable mechanism reducing the outer diameter of the endoscope to almost the diameter of the single camera in order to reduce the size of the insertion port. After the insertion the endoscope is deployed and the two cameras move side by side. A very simple compliant mechanism is used to drive the deployment and the adjustment of the convergence angle.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):014502-014502-6. doi:10.1115/1.4005782.

This work describes the mechanical and the electromagnetic design of a microwave surface applicator used to coagulate liver tissue in the treatment of hepatic tumors. A good prediction of the ratio between reflected and forward microwave power (return loss) is obtained with a finite element model using commercial software. Laboratory testing of the applicator performed in polyacrylamide gel (PAG) and in ex vivo bovine liver show a hemispherical heat distribution pattern and hemispherical ablations up to 20 mm in diameter and 15 mm in depth in a controlled manner in 1 min. The applicator can also be used to coagulate larger areas of tissue with 2–5 mm depth by moving the applicator on the surface of the tissue. Experimental results indicate that the coagulated volume of tissue is approximately proportional to the energy delivered into ex vivo bovine liver, hemispherical in shape, obtained in short time duration with a volumetric rate of coagulated tissue of about 50 mm3 /s.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):014503-014503-4. doi:10.1115/1.4005783.

At present, most of the orthopaedic implants used in articular reconstruction are fixed to host bone using acrylic bone-cement. Bone-cement polymerization leads to an exothermic reaction with heat release and consequent temperature rise. The increase of temperature in the bone beyond the tolerated limits can develop osteocyte thermal necrosis and ultimately lead to bone resorption at the cement-bone interface, with subsequent loosening of the implant. Another issue that plays an important role in implant loosening is debonding of the cement from the implant initiated by crack formation at the interfacial voids. It is well established that low porosity enables better fatigue cement properties. Moderate preheating of the implant is expected to reverse the direction of polymerization, and has the ability to reduce interfacial void formation and improve interfacial shear strength. To increase the implant temperature at the initial cementing phase in order to reduce interfacial void formation, and subsequently, cool the implant in the latter cement polymerization phase to prevent the possibility of bone thermal necrosis, a new automated electronic device was designed to be use in cemented joint replacements. The developed device was specifically designed for the knee arthroplasty, namely for tibial-tray cementing. The device controls the heat flux direction between the tibial-tray and the atmosphere through the “Peltier effect,” using Peltier tablets. The device is placed on the tibial-tray during the cementing phase and starts to heat it in a first phase, promoting the polymerization that initiates at the warmer cement-implant interface. In a second phase, the heat flux in the Peltier tablets is inverted to extract the heat generated during cement polymerization. The device efficiency was evaluated by cementing several tibial-trays in bovine fresh bone and measuring the tray and cement temperatures. The temperature results in the implant and in the cement showed that the device increases and maintains the implant temperature above room temperature at the initial cementing phase, while in the subsequent phase it cools the tibial-tray and cement. Significant differences were found for peak cement temperatures between the tests performed with and without the device. The device showed its capacity to promote the beginning of cement polymerization at the implant interface contributing towards improving interfacial shear strength and in reducing the peak cement temperature in the subsequent polymerization process, thus contributing to the prevention of the bone thermal necrosis effect.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):014504-014504-5. doi:10.1115/1.4005786.

A walker capable of providing vertical lift support can improve independence and increase mobility of individuals living with spinal cord injury (SCI). Using a novel lifting mechanism, a walker has been designed to provide sit-to-stand assistance to individuals with partially paralyzed lower extremity muscles. The design was verified through experiments with one individual with SCI. The results show the walker is capable of reducing the force demands on the upper and lower extremity muscles during sit-to-stand transition compared to standard walkers. The walker does not require electrical power and no grip force or harness is necessary during sit-to-stand operation, enabling its use by individuals with limited hand function. The design concept can be extended to aid other populations with lower extremity weakness.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

Technical Briefs: Commentary

J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017501-017501-1. doi:10.1115/1.4006151.

The following technical briefs were submitted, peer reviewed, and accepted for presentation at the 2014 University of Minnesota's Design of Medical Devices (DMD) Conference (www.dmd.umn.edu) held Apr. 7–10, 2014 at The Commons Hotel and McNamara Alumni Center in Minneapolis, Minneapolis, MN. The conference had another successful year with attendance reaching over 1,100 and raised $139,000 from 41 sponsors. The money raised will support medical devices education at the University of Minnesota, the University of Minnesota Medical Devices Center, and the DMD Conference expenses.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

Technical Briefs: 2012 Design of Medical Devices Conference Technical Briefs

J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017502-017502-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026680.
Abstract
Topics: Simulation , Errors
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017504-017504-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026682.
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017506-017506-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026684.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017507-017507-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026685.
Abstract
Topics: Nanoparticles , Cancer
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017510-017510-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026688.
Abstract
Topics: Rubber , Sterilization
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017511-017511-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026689.
Abstract
Topics: Error analysis
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017513-017513-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026691.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017517-017517-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026695.
Abstract
Topics: Air flow , Calibration
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017518-017518-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026696.
Abstract
Topics: Catheters , Stiffness
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017521-017521-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026699.
Abstract
Topics: Bone , Design
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017523-017523-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026701.
Abstract
Topics: Surgery
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017526-017526-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026704.
Abstract
Topics: Prostheses , Testing
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017527-017527-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026705.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017529-017529-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026707.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017530-017530-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026708.
Abstract
Topics: Stress , Orthopedics
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017531-017531-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026709.
Abstract
Topics: Polymers , Testing , Valves
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017532-017532-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026710.
Abstract
Topics: Textiles , Catheters
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017533-017533-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026711.
Abstract
Topics: Design , Pumps
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017534-017534-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026712.
Abstract
Topics: China , Sleep
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017535-017535-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026713.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017537-017537-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026715.
Abstract
Topics: Simulation , Testing
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017539-017539-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026717.
Abstract
Topics: stents
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017542-017542-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026720.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017543-017543-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026721.
Abstract
Topics: Design
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017544-017544-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026722.
Abstract
Topics: Design , Surgery
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017545-017545-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026723.
Abstract
Topics: Surgery
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017546-017546-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026724.
Abstract
Topics: Design
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017547-017547-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026725.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017548-017548-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026726.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017550-017550-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026728.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017551-017551-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026729.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017553-017553-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026731.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017554-017554-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026732.
Abstract
Topics: Sensors
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017555-017555-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026733.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017557-017557-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026735.
Abstract
Topics: Drilling
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017558-017558-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026736.
Abstract
Topics: Orthotics
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017559-017559-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026737.
Abstract
Topics: Robots
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017560-017560-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026738.
Abstract
Topics: Design
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017561-017561-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026739.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017563-017563-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026741.
Abstract
Topics: Gears , Wheelchairs
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017564-017564-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026742.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017565-017565-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026743.
Abstract
Topics: Design , Testing
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017567-017567-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026745.
Abstract
Topics: Microphones , Sleep
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017568-017568-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026746.
Abstract
Topics: Robots , Surgery , Calibration
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017573-017573-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026751.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017579-017579-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026757.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017580-017580-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026758.
Abstract
Topics: Design , Robotics
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017582-017582-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026760.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017583-017583-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026761.
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017584-017584-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026762.
Abstract
Topics: Lasers
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017585-017585-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026763.
Abstract
Topics: Biomedicine
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017586-017586-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026764.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017589-017589-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026767.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017593-017593-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026771.
Abstract
Topics: Orthotics
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017594-017594-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026772.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017597-017597-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026775.
Abstract
Topics: Computers , Brain
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017600-017600-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026778.
Abstract
Topics: Modeling
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017603-017603-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026781.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017604-017604-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026782.
Abstract
Topics: Design
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017606-017606-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026784.
Abstract
Topics: Heat , Sterilization
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017608-017608-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026786.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017610-017610-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026788.
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017611-017611-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026789.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):017612-017612-1. doi:10.1115/1.4026790.
Abstract
Topics: Stiffness
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

Design Innovation Papers

J. Med. Devices. 2012;6(1):015001-015001-5. doi:10.1115/1.4005785.

Solid focal and oligometastatic malignancies are appropriate targets for minimally invasive ablative procedures. Thermochemical ablation is an experimental minimally invasive procedure, which exploits certain features of current thermal and chemical tumor ablation therapies. Engineering principles have been used to design a device, which has been research-proven-capable of coagulating tissue through the combination of a thermal and chemical insult. This interventional device completes this assignment by separately guiding the flow of chemical reagents, drawn from auxiliary systems, to a point at the distal tip of an assembled apparatus. At this position, the respective flow-streams converge and undergo an exothermic reaction to produce a heated, hyperosmolar solute, which serves to ablate the targeted tissue. Ex and in vivo studies have confirmed the utility of this device and the physiologic toleration of this interventional concept.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

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